Margin to Centre
the marginalised driving change

Philanthropy has a role to play in tackling inequality and in supporting those most vulnerable to its effects. A philanthropic approach that focuses on those at the margins can assist in bringing these individuals and communities onto the development agenda.

Building voice, leadership and participation

 

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Building the Field: Philanthropy at the Margins

South Africa is a society in transition, characterised by deep inequalities and the enduring legacies of past injustices. Founded on principles of human rights, equality and justice, the South African Constitution charts the path toward a more equitable society. However, frequently those at the margins of social and political life are least likely to benefit from constitutional rights and democratic possibilities.

Philanthropy has a role to play in tackling inequality and in supporting those most vulnerable to its ill effects. A philanthropic approach that focuses on those at the margins can assist in bringing these individuals and communities onto the agenda for development priorities.

By bringing the margin to the centre the attention is drawn to vulnerable communities who face discrimination, and who are often neglected in the implementation of law and policy, and the delivery of services. Philanthropic investments to improve the lives of those who are socially and economically marginalised, can contribute to a fairer society in which both needs and rights can be more equitably met.

Constitutional principles of dignity, equality and freedom are embedded in the country’s legal framework. This provides a powerful platform on which the rights of the vulnerable can be asserted6.  Through community mobilisation and advocacy, alongside the use of media, the courts, and law and policy processes, human rights are being advanced in significant ways.

The transition to being a fully-fledged democracy is about recognising the ways in which various struggles for human rights intersect with one another. I think that has been one of the key lessons for civil society: how do we start to take on the struggles of other marginalised groups?*
Melanie Judge, LGBTI activist

 

Philanthropic endeavours in South Africa are increasingly paying attention to those communities whose livelihoods and rights are compromised in a society with growing inequality. There is growing support for philanthropy that promotes social justice, and that partners with communities to tackle the root causes of inequality and its disproportionate impacts on marginalised groups.

The Atlantic Philanthropies Reconciliation and Human Rights programme focused its support on three marginalised communities in South Africa, namely:

  • Farmworkers and the rural poor
  • Refugees, asylum-seekers and undocumented migrants
  • Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) people

As the below In Actions illustrates, Atlantic grantees have been instrumental in bringing these communities, and the violations and marginalisations they face, into the centre of social transformation efforts toward a more just and equal society.